Insight With Beth Ruyak

Hosted By Beth Ruyak

A daily, in-depth interview program providing context and background to the issues that face our region.


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Sound Advice: Rising Female Jazz Instrumentalists


In this week’s Sound Advice Jazz Music Director Gary Vercelli reviews new releases by rising female jazz instrumentalists plus a classical/jazz fusion project by trumpeter Tom Harrell.


Kirsten Edkins, "Art & Soul," Art & Soul

Not your average southern California teenager, Kirsten idolized Cannonball Adderley and Kenny Garrett at age 14. She was mentored by saxophonist Bob Sheppard, who produced her debut album. She has a beautiful tone on soprano sax, a difficult instrument to master. She is surrounded by top sidemen, including Larry Goldings on keyboards. At a young age, Kirsten has already found her own sound.


Angela Davis, "41 St. Nick,"The Art of The Melody

Angela hails from Australia and now works out of NYC. This song is built on the chord changes of “A Weaver of Dreams” and is inspired by Lee Konitz. Linda Oh is featured on bass.


Amina Figarov, "Hear My Voice," Blue Whisper

Amina is a versatile pianist and an emerging composer. She was born in  Baku, Azerbaijan and she attended the Berklee College of Music in Boston. This track features 8-year- old Salhiya, expressing her fears and concerns about violence in our inner cities. Amina’s composition enhances the young  girl’s expressed concerns.


London, Meader, Pramuk & Ross, "On the Red Clay," The Royal Bopsters Project

The late Mark Murphy is featured as a special guest on this classic Freddie Hubbard composition. There’s no doubt that Mark was a true jazz singer. The group’s beautiful harmonies support Mark’s vocal explorations. This is great vocal jazz in the tradition of Lambert, Hendricks & Ross.


Tom Harrell, "Sainte," First Impressions

Trumpeter Tom Harrell explores the works of Debussy and Ravel through a jazz prism. His working quartet is augmented with violin, flute, cello and guitar. This 9 piece chamber ensemble blurs the lines between classical and jazz. I think Maurice Ravel would dig this!



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