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Sammy Caiola / Capital Public Radio

Health Care

April 24, 2019

Opponents Spar Over California Vaccine Exemption Bill

Hundreds of critics of mandatory vaccines were in Sacramento Wednesday opposing a California proposal to give state public health officials instead of local doctors the power to decide which children can skip their shots before attending school.

Andrew Nixon / CapRadio

April 24, 2019

Julia Mitric

California Lawmaker Wants To Buy Organic For School Meals

A bill that would put more organic food on school lunch trays in California is working its way through the Legislature. It would launch a $2 million pilot program to help a handful of school districts purchase organic foods from California growers.

politifact-promo-20181211.png
Sean Havey for California Dream

Graying California: Two Portraits Of How The Golden State Is Dealing With Its Aging Population

CapRadio’s healthcare reporter Sammy Caiola and food and sustainability reporter Julia Mitric talk about their stories in the Graying California series. They profile pianist Cliff Shockney and farming couple Alan Haight and Jo McProud

NIH Image Gallery / Flickr

What To Know About The Ethics And Science Of DNA Testing

UC Davis Professors Graham Coop and Meaghan O’Keefe preview their public lecture on the promises, pitfalls and social risks of DNA testing.

Courtesy of Rachel Howard

'The Risk Of Us' Novel Explores Becoming A Foster Parent

“The Risk of Us” is Rachel Howard’s debut novel. It’s about a couple who fosters a child with the goal of adopting her. But along with the joys, there are significant bumps along the way, leading the couple of have to make a pivotal decision.

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NPRScience

Scientists Explain A Common Fight In Basketball

April 24, 2019

Are players just pretending to be so certain the ball is out on their opponent? Or could there be a difference in how they experience the event that has them pointing a finger at the other player?