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Jazz Night In America: Herbie Hancock's Latest Voyage

Suraya Mohamed | NPR MUSIC

Herbie Hancock always seems to be on some kind of voyage. Whether he's improvising in a spaceship surrounded by 11 keyboards or forming new iterations of bands, you can always count on him to push the possibilities and the boundaries of jazz.

This concert presentation includes the most recent member of the group: Flying Lotus and Terrace Martin on keyboards and alto saxophone. It also features Lionel Loueke on guitar and vocals, James Genus on bass, and Trevor Lawrence Jr. on drums.

On this radio episode, Jazz Night in America host Christian McBride sits down with Hancock to discuss his technological journey over the years. We'll also hear stories from Herbie's longtime keyboard tech, Bryan Bell, and a testimonial from Paris Strother, keyboard player for the R&B trio KING.

Performers

Herbie Hancock (piano, keytar, vocals), James Genus (bass), Trevor Lawrence, Jr. (drums), Lionel Loueke (guitar, vocals), Terrace Martin (keyboards, vocals, alto saxophone)

Credits

Producers: Alex Ariff, Patrick Jarenwattananon, Colin Marshall, Katie Simon; Editors: Colin Marshall, Nikki Boliaux; Audio Engineer: David Tallacksen; Concert Videographers: Colin Marshall, Nick Michael, Olivia Merrion, Chris Parks, AJ Wilhelm; Host, Christian McBride; Executive Producers: Gabrielle Armand, Anya Grundmann, Amy Niles; Special Thanks: Jay Eigenmann, Simon Rentner; Concert Produced By: This Is Our Music/Brice Rosenbloom, BRIC Celebrate Brooklyn! Festival/Jack Walsh; Funded in part by: The Argus Fund, Doris Duke Foundation, The National Endowment for the Arts, The Wyncote Foundation

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

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