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Brown Signs Nearly 90, Vetoes More Than 20 Measures Over The Weekend


Updated Sunday at 4:25 p.m. --

California Governor Jerry Brown acted on more than 100 of the bills remaining on his desk this weekend.

The governor signed a measure that requires landlords to inform tenants about how to watch out for bed bugs. Another approved measure requires the state Denti-Cal program to simplify what dentists have complained is needlessly complex paperwork to enroll in the program.

The governor vetoed five bills on Sunday that he called an end run around the budget process. Among other things, they would have added a diaper benefit for welfare recipients with young children and increased payments to blind and disabled seniors.

Brown also rejected having the state pay the local emergency costs from the San Bernardino shooting, which he said would set a bad precedent, despite the tragedy.

The governor still has more than 300 bills remaining on his desk, and the rest of the week to act on them.

Original post -- Gov. Jerry Brown has signed a bill allowing for CPR training to become a high school graduation requirement and a bill that allows good Samaritans to break into unattended hot cars to rescue animals.

Meanwhile, he rejected a bill that would have made changes to California's school accountability system.

The CPR in Schools legislation would require schools to teach students hands-on CPR and how to use an automated external defibrillator. The law will go into effect during the 2018-2019 school year.

The legislation on CPR education and the right to rescue animals in a hot vehicle were among the nearly 50 bills Brown signed on Saturday.

Meanwhile, Brown vetoed a dozen other bills including AB 2548, which would have made changes to CA's school accountability system. Education reformers lobbied heavily for the bill's passage.

In his veto message, Brown said the bill would impose new requirements for the accountability system that's already been developed by the state's department of education.