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Wind, Winter Weather Advisories In Effect

File / Rich Pedroncelli / AP
 

File / Rich Pedroncelli / AP

9:30 a.m.:  The thousand-mile coast of California is covered in warnings, watches and advisories for rain, flooding and high surf as another El Nino storm moves in from the Pacific. Wednesday's system will pack colder temperatures, stronger winds and heavier rainfall than the two previous storms that have slammed the state since last weekend.

Motorists in mountain areas are warned that blizzard conditions are possible above 4,000 feet --  including several inches of snow and wind gusts up to 60 mph.

Flash flooding and flows of mud and debris are a worry in foothill neighborhoods beneath areas left barren by last year's wildfires.

The National Weather Service is also issuing a wind advisory Wednesday morning. It's bringing high winds and heavy rains to the Sacramento region. Southeast winds with gusts up to 50 mph are forecasted through Wednesday afternoon.

The storm hit at the height of the morning's commute. In the Bay Area trees toppled and streets were flooded around most of the region. The California Highway Patrol estimated there were nearly two dozen weather-related crashes on Wednesday during the morning drive. The National Weather Service has issued a flash-flood watch for nearly the entire Bay Area.

The system is packing colder temperatures, stronger winds and heavier rain than two previous storms as it heads toward the Central Coast and Southern California. In the Los Angeles area, county officials have spent extra to offer more shelter options for its large homeless population.
 

9 a.m.: The thousand-mile coast of California is covered in warnings, watches and advisories for rain, flooding and high surf as another El Niño storm moves in from the Pacific.

Wendesday's system will pack colder temperatures, stronger winds and heavier rainfall than the two previous storms that have slammed the state since last weekend. Motorists in mountain areas are warned that blizzard conditions are possible above 4,000 feet -- including several inches of snow and wind gusts up to 50 mph.

Flash flooding and flows of mud and debris are a worry in foothill neighborhoods beneath areas left barren by last year's wildfires.

The National Weather Service has also issued a series of winter weather advisories from Reno to near Las Vegas as the first back-to-back storms make their way into Nevada. 

Snow started falling about 10 a.m. Tuesday in Reno, where a weather advisory remains in effect until 7 p.m. Forecasters also issued a winter storm watch for the area effective from 10 a.m. Wednesday until 4 a.m. Thursday.

Sens. Harry Reid and Dean Heller both canceled appearances in Reno Tuesday due to flight delays.

The weather service says about a foot of snow is possible at the upper elevations around Lake Tahoe by Wednesday night, up to a half-foot at lake level.

It also predicts up to a foot of snow by Wednesday morning near the top of Mt. Charleston outside Las Vegas, with rain in the metro area.

8:44 a.m.: California is covered in warnings, watches and advisories for rain, flooding and high surf as another El Niño storm moves in from the Pacific Wednesday.

This system will pack colder temperatures, stronger winds and heavier rainfall than the two previous storms that have slammed the state since last weekend.

Motorists are being advised to be careful if you're driving in mountain areas as blizzard conditions are possible above 4,000 feet -- including several inches of snow and wind gusts up to 60 mph.

Flash flooding and flows of mud and debris are a worry in foothill neighborhoods beneath areas left barren by last year's wildfires.

Original Post: A winter weather advisory remains in effect until early Thursday morning. The heaviest snow is expected along highway 89.

Whiteout conditions and blowing snow are expected over the Sierra passes. About 2 feet of snow are forecasted to fall on the highest mountain tops over the next two weeks.

Meanwhile in the Valley, the heaviest precipitation will arrive Wednesday night, impacting evening commutes. 

Strong winds are expected in the San Joaquin and Southern Sacramento Valley. Officials are warning that the winds may down trees and cause power outages. The National Weather Service has issued a wind advisory and southeast winds with gusts up to 50 mph are forecasted Wednesday afternoon.

Flash flooding and flows of mud and debris are a concern this week with so much rain falling on California -- especially in places left barren by last year's wildfires. 

Residents of the Silverado Canyon burn area in Orange County and the Solimar burn area in Ventura County have been urged to consider evacuating.