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Feds Unveil Interactive Tool Showing Colorado River Drought

U.S. Department Of The Interior / Doi.Gov

Between 2001 and 2015, Lake Mead’s elevation dropped from 1,196 to 1,075 feet, a decline of 121 feet.

U.S. Department Of The Interior / Doi.Gov

(AP) -- Federal agencies have unveiled an interactive Web display showing high-water to low-water data and images resulting from a historic 16-year drought in the Colorado River basin.
 
The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation titles the presentation "Drought in the Colorado River Basin - Insights Using Open Data."
 
Bureau spokesman Peter Soeth said Wednesday that project folks just call it the "drought visualization tool."
 
It's a self-guided tour using graphs, charts, photos and maps.
 
It shows reservoirs drying like puddles on a river that serves seven Western states and supplies drinking water to one in 10 Americans.
 
The Colorado also irrigates farms in a land area comparable to New Jersey, the Garden State.
 
The release comes amid projections that water deliveries to Nevada, Arizona and Southern California may be curtailed as early as 2017.