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Bill Proposes Labeling of Flame Retardants in Furniture

Emily Lewis / Flickr
 

Emily Lewis / Flickr

Last year, California regulators implemented new fire safety standards that don’t require the use of flame retardant chemicals in furniture.

Supporters of the regulation say flame retardants are associated with a variety of health problems including cancer, hormone disruption and decreased fertility.

The proposed bill, authored by Democratic Senator Mark Leno, would require manufacturers to disclose on the furniture’s label whether flame retardant chemicals were used. He says it's the says this is the logical next step.

 “To minimal allow manufacturers to meet a fire safety standard without the need of chemicals and then to communicate whether or not a consumer product has these chemicals to the consumer is a great step forward for all of us,” says Leno.

Judy Levin is with the Center for Environmental Health.

 “I know that as purchasing a couch, I spent many times thinking about what color I wanted it to be, what shape I wanted it to be, whether I wanted legs on it or no legs on it and I didn’t realize that the biggest issue I had to make as a consumer was whether I wanted flame retardant chemicals or not, I didn’t have that information," says Levin.

The legislation would also require disclosure near the furniture’s price or description. The first hearing on the legislation is next week.

 

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