Reservoirs Rising But Still Well Below Normal



Share | |
(Sacramento, CA)
Tuesday, March 04, 2014

Folsom -Lake -USA-drought -before -after -2-620x 347

Source: California Department of Water Resources

 

Several days of rain and snow have raised water levels in most major California reservoirs in the past month. 

But, Doug Carlson with the California Department of Water Resources says the state is nowhere near even a normal year for rain and snow.

"That would take considerable precipitation -very heavy rain and snow- from now til perhaps the end of April to achieve the normal readings that we would expect in the snow pack for this time of year," he says. "That's just not in the forecast."

The eight inches of water in the Sierra snow pack is less than a-third of normal for this time of year.

 

030314-res2

Carlson says a below-average snow pack makes for a less-than-promising forecast for water storage.

"To help us get through this extended dry period we would need almost-every-other-day kind of heavy precipitation to begin to fill the reservoirs," says Carlson. "But, we're so far below what is normal for this time of date, that it would appear to be that we're just not going to see it."

Most of the other reservoirs in the state saw current capacity increase by one-to-four percent in the past month. 

After starting the year as the worst drought on record, water levels have risen to at least match those last seen during the drought of 1976 and 77.

 

030314-res3

 

Source: CDEC.water.ca.gov

 

 

Drought-banner

Related Stories

  • Water Use Drops In Sacramento Region in September

    Thursday, October 30, 2014

    Overall water use decreased again in September compared to last year in the Sacramento region. Water providers are also pumping less groundwater, despite a heavier reliance on it in the drought.

  • Amy Quinton / Capital Public Radio

    California Still At Risk Of Floods During Drought

    Wednesday, October 22, 2014

    If a flood were to hit Twitchell Island in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta it would threaten much of California’s water supply. It’s why emergency management agencies are holding flood-fighting exercises during a drought.

We Get Support From:
Become a Supporter

We Get Support From:

Become a Supporter