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California Senators Introduce Bill To Get More Water To Dry Communities

File / AP
 

File / AP

 
Despite the rain and snow in California over the last week, officials say the drought is nowhere near over. Farmers, ranchers and municipalities are still looking for ways to deal with it.
 
Feinstein’s legislation would provide flexibility under current law for federal and state agencies to get more water downstream. Feinstein says her the goal is simple. 
 “…provide an opportunity for gates to be open more at times when fish are not affected and in general to process requests as quickly as possible.” ~ Sen. Dianne Feinstein  

The bill provide $300 million for water projects, but Feinstein admits it’s not going to solve all of California’s water problems.  
“The estimate is that this could bring about some new water but not the sun, the moon and the stars, so it is not a big, broad bill.” 

House Republicans passed legislation to ease environmental laws that restrict the flow of water in the San Joaquin Delta. It’s unclear if or when the Senate bill will be voted on but for it to become law it will need to be coupled with its House counterpart. 

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Matt Laslo

Contributing Washington DC Reporter

Based on Capitol Hill, Matt Laslo is a reporter who has been covering Congress, the White House and the Supreme Court since 2006. He has filed stories for NPR and more than 40 of its affiliates, including Capital Public Radio.  Read Full Bio