Calif. Leaders Working On Urgency Bill To Combat Drought



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(Sacramento, CA)
Thursday, January 30, 2014

According to Senate President pro Tem Darrell Steinberg's office, the $588 million proposal would fund shovel-ready water projects, clear away some regulations and help water agencies use existing supplies more efficiently. More specifically, it would increase the use of clean recycled water, encourage conservation programs and expand the use of captured storm-water

About $470 million would come from Proposition 84 bond funds currently in the governor's January budget proposal; the bill would speed up the use of that money, rather than waiting for the budget to become law in July. The rest of the money would come from Prop 1E bond funds, cap-and-trade revenues and the state's general fund.

The urgency legislation could be unveiled within days – with the goal of enacting it into law in the next few weeks.

In the meantime, Brown had some advice for Californians as he met with water managers in Los Angeles Thursday:

"Don’t flush more than you have to, don’t shower longer than you need to, and turn the water off when you’re shaving or brushing your teeth."

~Gov. Jerry Brown

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