Roseville To Start Using Groundwater In Effort To Preserve Folsom Reservoir



Share | |
(Sacramento, CA)
Monday, January 27, 2014

Starting Monday, Roseville is turning on its four aquifer wells and delivering groundwater to customers as part of an effort to preserve Folsom Reservoir.

Folsom Reservoir, the city's main water source, is only about 18 percent full -- a near-record low.

Roseville's Environmental Utilities Director, Ed Kriz, says that's why turning on the wells now is so important.

"These are unprecedented times," he says. "We've never seen conditions this bad in the watershed.  We feel that we need to do this measure at this time to be able to preserve the water that is in Folsom so that we have an opportunity to stretch that supply through the summer when it will be critical."

The reservoir also supplies water to the City of Folsom and the San Juan Water District.

Folsom Lake -levels

Kriz says Roseville has never run all four wells at once.  He says the water meets all regulatory standards for drinking water, but he says some customers may notice the change, as the groundwater tends to have a harder quality.

Roseville is also asking customers to cut their water use by 20 percent. Water districts in Citrus Heights and both the city and county of Sacramento are also using well water.

Related Stories

  • Amy Quinton/Capital Public Radio

    California's Drought Pushes Tiny Fish Toward Extinction

    Thursday, August 14, 2014

    Researchers at UC Davis fear that California’s drought may soon claim its first victim, the Red Hills Roach. The tiny fish is losing its water. Scientists fear it may soon be pushed to extinction.

  • Rich Ibarra / Capital Public Radio

    Cost Of California Farming Grows

    Thursday, August 14, 2014

    California's farm production costs totaled $36.6 billion in 2013, an 8.6 percent jump from the previous year. Higher rates for feed, labor, improvements and water contributed to the jump.

  • Rich Pedroncelli / AP

    Water Bond Deal Draws Rare Unity At Capitol

    Thursday, August 14, 2014

    Californians will be voting on a new water bond this fall. On Wednesday night, Gov. Jerry Brown and state lawmakers replaced the $11 billion bond on the November ballot with a smaller one they believe has a better chance of passing at the polls.

We Get Support From:
Become a Supporter

We Get Support From:

Become a Supporter