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Public Hearing Today On Fracking Regulations

  

Jason Marshall, Chief Deputy Director for the Department of Conservation says the purpose of the public hearings is straightforward.

“What is in those regulations that people would like to see changed? What is not in those regulations that they think need to be added?” he says.

As of January first, new interim regulations require the oil and gas industry to disclose chemicals used in the fracking process, monitor groundwater and notify neighbors of drilling.

But the proposed permanent regulations also require operators to obtain permits.

Marshall says he expects turnout to be significant, which is why the hearings are scheduled for four hours.

“We understand there are folk who are concerned about the practice and will want to voice, you know, we think you left this entire issue out of your regulations and we’re really here to take those comments,” says Marshall.

Hearings are scheduled for Monday in Sacramento and Long Beach. Three other hearings will be held across the state including Bakersfield and Salinas Wednesday and Santa Maria on Jan. 15.
"We actually anticipate that we may have to ask people to keep their comments to five minutes or so if we’ve got so many people," says Marshall.

Public Hearings

Sacramento -- January 6, Sierra Room, California Environmental Protection Agency Building, 10th & I streets, 3-7 p.m.

Long Beach -- January 6, California State University-Long Beach auditorium, 1212 Bellflower Boulevard, 3-7 p.m.

Bakersfield -- January 8, Kern County Administrative Center, first floor board chambers, 1115 Truxtun Avenue, 3-7 p.m.

Salinas -- January 8, National Steinbeck Center, One Main Street, 3-7 p.m.

Santa Maria -- January 13, Santa Barbara County supervisors hearing room, 511 East Lakeside Parkway, 3-7 p.m. 

 

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