Morning Edition


    

An in-depth roundup of the latest news, along with reports, analysis, and commentaries from NPR and Capital Public Radio News. Hosted locally by Donna Apidone with statewide and regional news anchored by Steve Milne.

2 a.m. to 9 a.m. Monday-Friday 

Morning Edition website at NPR.org 



Latest Headlines

N.H. Promises To Let D.C. Residents Buy Booze There

A clerk in Concord recently refused to sell liquor to a resident of the nation's capital because state law says licenses from other states can be used to buy booze, and Washington isn't a state.


For Iraqis In Crisis, Dividing The Country Seems A Poor Solution

For centuries, Shiites, Sunnis and Kurds had coexisted in Mosul, but some fear ruptures there may be harbingers of the partition of Iraq. If that happens, Ahmed Ali may never see his farm again.


Venezuelans Celebrate Chavez With A Focus On His Handwriting

The handwriting is familiar to Venezuelans: Chavez spent hours on national TV writing and drawing to explain his policies, mostly in caps and socialist red. It's also a computer font: ChavezPro.


On NASA's Birthday, Mars Rover Sets A Mileage Record

NASA's Opportunity Mars rover set a record Monday for driving a longer distance than any other manmade craft sent to another celestial body.


Crews Are Containing Western Wildfires, But More Bad Weather's Ahead

Firefighters are making good progress on a number of destructive wildfires burning in the West. In Washington, fire crews are hoping to contain the largest fire in that state's history within the next week.


Ruling Against D.C.'s Gun Law Sends Local Officials Scrambling

A federal judge struck down the city's ban on carrying handguns in public. The latest ruling follows a Supreme Court decision in 2008 that overturned the city's blanket ban on handgun ownership.


U.S. Aid To Rebels In Syria: Too Little Too Late?

Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.


LA Bicycle Commuters Form 'Bike Trains' For Safety

A challenge in getting people to bike in big cities is fear of an accident. So a group of activists started a network of bicycle commuters. This story first aired on Weekends on All Things Considered.


Crime Writer Creates A Hero For Her Beloved, Much-Maligned South LA

In her new book, Rachel Howzell Hall introduces Elouise "Lou" Norton, a fiercely ambitious homicide detective who patrols the same Los Angeles streets that she — and Hall — grew up on.


Ghost Cats And Musket Balls: Stories Told By Capitol Interns

Giving Capitol tours to constituents is a primary duty of Hill interns. They provide a great deal of information, but sometimes they're a little short on actual history.



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