All Things Considered


    

NPR’s daily afternoon news program offers an in-depth presentation of the day’s news, with some of the nation’s best reporting, commentary, and analysis. Hosted locally by Devin Yamanaka with statewide news anchored by Ed Joyce.

3:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Monday-Friday
All Things Considered Website

Latest Headlines

 
Who Are The Protesters Getting Arrested In Ferguson?
The violence at night in Ferguson, Mo., has calmed down for now. However, there have been more than 160 people arrested since the protests began. Police records offer a sense of who they are.
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In Covering Foley's Killing, Media Outlets Face A Difficult Choice
The execution of the American journalist James Foley by ISIS casts new attention on how news organizations cover graphic violence, and how they cover the risks taken by their own colleagues and peers.

European Fighters Take On More Prominent Roles In The Islamic State
The hunt is on to identify the man in the James Foley execution video who speaks with a British accent. An estimated 2,000 Europeans have left home to join the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.
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The Dynamics Of Demanding Ransom From Nations
Since the release of a video depicting the killing of American journalist James Foley, it has been revealed that the militant group Islamic State demanded millions of dollars for his freedom. Rukmini Callimachi of The New York Times explains how militant groups use ransom demands such as these for funding.

Failed Foley Rescue Reveals Challenges Faced By U.S. Intelligence
Earlier in the summer, a U.S. raid failed to rescue American hostages in Syria, including journalist James Foley, who was executed in a video released this week by Islamist militants. The hostages were not where they were thought to be. NPR's Dina Temple-Raston discusses the limits on America's ability to gather intelligence in Syria, as well as the latest developments since Foley was killed.

American Ebola Patients Leave Atlanta Hospital Healthy
Two U.S. missionaries who caught the Ebola virus in Liberia have been discharged from an Atlanta hospital after fully recovering. They were the first known Ebola patients flown to the U.S. for treatment. Both received an experimental drug called ZMapp, but it remains unclear what role that treatment played in their recovery.
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One Woman's 'Pay It Forward' Moment Inspires 11 Hours Of Kindness
At a drive-through Starbucks in St. Petersburg, Fla., a chain of generosity included hundreds of customers.

North Carolina Senate Race Shapes Up As Unpopularity Contest
One of the most expensive Senate races this year is in North Carolina, where Democratic incumbent Kay Hagen is trying to keep her job. Her approval numbers are dismal, but so are those for her GOP opponent, North Carolina House Speaker Thom Tillis.

McDonnell Takes The Stand, Founding Defense On Marital Dysfunction
In the corruption trial of Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell and his wife, McDonnell took the stand as a witness. Jeff E. Schapiro, politics columnist for the Richmond Times-Dispatch, discusses the testimony with Robert Siegel.

The Quandary At Jackson Hole: Is It Time To Step Back From Stimulus?
With the economy showing signs of positive momentum, the Federal Reserve is facing familiar questions at its monetary symposium in Jackson Hole, Wyo. Chief among these: Are interest rates too low? Robert Siegel asks Alan Blinder of Princeton University.


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