All Things Considered


    

NPR’s daily afternoon news program offers an in-depth presentation of the day’s news, with some of the nation’s best reporting, commentary, and analysis. Hosted locally by Devin Yamanaka with statewide news anchored by Ed Joyce.

3:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Monday-Friday
All Things Considered Website

Latest Headlines

 
In Syria, The U.S. Weighs A Range Of Unpalatable Options
The U.S. could aid moderate rebels. It could bomb militants of the Islamic State. Or it could sit on the sidelines as the war plays out. There are many choices, but none appears promising.

Yogi Iyengar, Who Helped Bring Yoga To The West, Dies At 95
The man who helped popularize the practice of yoga around the world has died at the age of 95 in India. B.K.S. Iyengar had created his own brand of yoga, which was practiced by artists like Aldous Huxley.

EPA Wades Into Water Fight With Farmers
The EPA wants to "clarify" the scope of its oversight of water under the Clean Water Act. Big farm groups like the American Farm Bureau Federation call this a power grab that would place every ditch and mud puddle under federal regulation, forcing farmers to get permits for small trenches around the farm.

Militants Behead American Journalist, Leveling New Threats At U.S.
The group known as the Islamic State has fired its first violent salvo against the U.S. The group declared that the beheading is a retaliation for U.S. airstrikes in Iraq.

In Liberia, An Ebola Quarantine Descends Into Riots
After the Liberian government ordered a quarantine of one of the poorest neighborhoods in its capital, Monrovia, residents there woke up to find themselves cut off from the rest of the city by security forces. By midday, the neighborhood was in riot.

Parsing The Rulebook To A Police Officer's Use Of Force
More than a week now from the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., it's worth asking: Ideally, what should happen with a police officer stops someone in the street?

Legendary Vermont Bakers May Stop Selling Beloved Sourdough Bread
The bread that Jules and Helen Rabin have made in their fieldstone oven for four decades has a cult following in central Vermont. But this may be the last summer they sell it at the farmers market.

To Achieve Diversity In Publishing, A Difficult Dialogue Beats Silence
The American publishing industry has long been the realm of the privileged few. Lately, though, some writers of color are making their voices heard — and starting some uncomfortable conversations.

Gaza Violence Tests Once-Unshakable Allies U.S. And Israel
Both sides have traded barbs and criticism over the other's policies. Some believe the public feud stems from a personal animosity between President Obama and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Spiderman, Batman And Elmo Team Up To Fight Times Square Restrictions
Times Square performers, who often don characters' costumes, have been a New York City staple for years, exchanging photos for tips. Lately, though, city officials have said tipping the performers is optional, and the city council is pushing for all performers to be licensed. The performers have responded with an announcement that they're organizing for collective action.


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