Proposed Bill Would Change Solitary Confinement In Calif. Prisons



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(Sacramento, CA)
Monday, April 27, 2015

Sen. Loni Hancock (D-Oakland) plans to introduce legislation today that would revise the practice of solitary confinement, or security housing units.

The Democrat says her bill would require the Office of the Inspector General to review some solitary confinement cases. It would also require the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to provide inmates with an advocate throughout the process.

The bill would prohibit the placement of seriously mentally ill inmates in solitary confinemen.

Hanncock says her legislation would also provide those inmates confined in Security housing units with opportunities to interact with other inmates and staff.

CDCR says Security Housing units are designed to house offenders whose conduct endangers the safety of others. After last summer's hunger strike, CDCR announced a pilot program that allows some offenders to ease their way out of Security Housing Units. 

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