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City Of Sacramento: Meters Won't Be Used To Penalize Water Wasters

  

The City of Sacramento has ordered a mandatory 20 percent reductionin water use.

California Governor Jerry Brown has asked for the same reduction statewide.

It's possible the City could use data from the water meters it has installed to identify noncompliance. But, the city's Director of Utilities Dave Brent says there will be no double standard for people because they have meters.

"I just don't think it's fair. I think the way we're doing it is a good way to do it. We're going to look at our overall production numbers. We're going to institute best management practices if you will."

~Dave Brent, Director of Utilities

There are about 136,000 single-family residences in the city.

The city is spending $77 million to have 60 percent of those residences on meters by 2016.

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